© 2019 Australian National Pigeon Association. 

LOST PIGEONS

ANPA cares about the health and well-being of all birds, but we can't trace pigeons that are not wearing an ANPA band. If the ring does not have the letters ANPA, you will need to check other sources. if the ring has a clear plastic protective coating, it probably is a racing pigeon.


First ensure the bird has some water available, and give it some seed in case it's hungry (parrot seed is fine, or even some rice, if nothing else is available try bread, pigeons do not eat meat.)

 

Check the bird's legs for a plastic registration ring. Some fancy pigeon breeds have long foot featheringso you may have to hunt through the feathers to find it, often in these breeds, the ring may be up high on the thigh.

 

Once the details are found write down all the numbers and letters on the ring. It will have numbers and letters both horizontally and vertically.

 

For example, it will have ANPA 18 (the year the bird was rung) a letter from A-D (the size of the ring) and a number eg: 12347, this is what is called the ring number, the individual identification for each bird.

 

If the letters "ANPA" appear, you are in luck, as the ring was issued by the Australian National Pigeon Association (ANPA) and can be traced to the club and individual who bought the batch the ring number was in, and thus bred the pigeon.

 

To search for the club that issues the ringcheck out the Ring Registry below:

ANPA RINGS ISSUED 2008 - 2011

ANPA RINGS ISSUED 2012 - 2015a

ANPA RINGS ISSUED 2012 - 2015b

ANPA RINGS ISSUED 2016

ANPA RINGS ISSUED 2017 - 2018

 

Remember, if the ring does not have the letters ANPA, you will need to check other sources. if the ring has a clear plastic protective coating, it probably is a racing pigeon. So you will need to check for Racing Pigeon clubs on the web, or in the telephone book under clubs and societies.

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